There are so many things I’m learning from raising boys. When they were younger, it was the usual – and obvious – things. Mine, in particular, were very rowdy. I remember saying, “No, Mom is not your jungle gym,” on more than a handful of occasions. Mine were also louder than others, or so it seemed in our tiny house. And if I remember correctly, they were also very inquisitive and both could negotiate their way out of nearly any situation when challenged. What’s interesting, is that with each step and misstep, I continue to learn from them. I am surprised how often I expect to be the teacher, yet, I constantly am reminded that I can also be their student.

Lately, their strongest influences seem to be their peers insofar as what’s cool, what’s “lit” and what’s a “cap” (which apparently means a lie). Of course, as has been the case for decades, that extends to what they wear and how they wear it. In today’s culture, the fascination and dependence on social media and by extension social media influencers permeates so much of their personalities. It’s not unusual to see teenagers randomly doing dances they’ve seen – and memorized – on TicTok or proudly wearing some “merch” featuring a saying or logo from a YouTuber they follow. It’s literally everywhere. Which to me is a little crazy, given that when I owned a pair of “cool Jordache” jeans when I was a kid, that was a huge deal. Brands were not as savvy then as they are now.

But when I think about the fact that in fewer than 10 years, both of my boys will (hopefully) be well out of college and could possibly making buying decisions within their workplaces, it makes me want to know and understand the importance of creating brand loyalty early and consistently. If anything, we can all learn something from hugely successful brands like Apple and Google. These are the companies that clearly know the value of having brand loyalists who can, in turn, advocate on your behalf. On a small scale, it happens in my own household with one son finding a new, cool influencer and sharing them with his brother and his friends.

So the question is, how hard are you working to build these types of relationships with and for your promo buyers? Are you showing them that you know what’s happening in the promo industry, offering solutions to their marketing problems and assisting them with marketing their brand? For your buyers, YOU are the cool promo expert who knows what can help them create brand loyalists and advocates. The result of cultivating these types of relationships for them, is that they’ll appreciate that you’ve gone the extra mile. They’ll understand that you made a difference in their business. Best of all, they’ll come back to you the next time they have a marketing or branding challenge.

The Vernon Company is recognized as one of the largest and most successful promotional product firms in North America. Founded in 1902 by F.L. Vernon, we serve more than 40,000 customers from our Newton, Iowa corporate headquarters.

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